Mirsarai

Blood group





Any accidental moment doesn't come by saying. It can be happened suddenly. More of we lost our some dearest one's life due to insufficient of blood. It can be you too.

Here it is a little database of Blood Group. Be a Blood Donor or Get a Blood Donor, whatever you are. This Database can  help you  anytime. Add yourself here.

 Your one bag Blood can save one life. Blood donor  is  the  greatest donor  of the world.

(After every 4 month you can donate one bag blood easily, you will not get any kind of effect on your body. Rather it will refresh you mind).

.

Sadia tabassum



Father's Name: : Mominul haque
Mother's Name : Parvin akter
Age : 18
Blood Group : O(positive)
Donated : 0 time.
Agree to Donate Blood : Non
Last Time of Donte : 0
Mobile Number : 2147483647
Present Adress : Osman pur,5no Osmanpur,post:Azampur,Mirsarai
Pemanent Address : Same as
Facebook ID : www.facebook.com/s.tabassum
E-mail : sadia_ah@hotmail.com
Added Date : 2016-02-23 13:34:29
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Your name
Father name
Mother name
Age
Blood Group
How many time Blood Donated
Agree to Donate Blood (YES/NO/NG)
Last Time of Donted (example:31-12-2010).
Mobile Number
Present Adress
Pemanent Address

Facebook ID (e.g. www.facebook.com/rainbow)

A(positive) (9), A(negative) (1), B(positive) (5), B(negative) (1), O(positive) (14), O(negative) (0), AB(positive) (1), AB(negative) (0).
who joined with us:
JimmiXSJimmiXSMarkMejbaur Rahman MejbaMd.Abdul Qaiyumarafat rahman minhazIFTEKHAR UC RAHATAshaduzzamanS.R.RiadRazim Uddin PavelMonzuBasharmd.alauddin{ala}sohidul islamsheikh zahedAshraf ArifMd Sirazul IslamYahia Anowararif moinMD. SHIBLU AKBARsohidul islamMahfuzr RahmanMainul IslamSharif Mahmud RajibMd.Riaz Morshed chyAbuhena KaisarEngr.masukOsman mas\'udAminul AhasanSadia tabassumMasuk Uddin
top donor:
Taniful ahsanAbuhena Kaisarsohidul islamAminul AhasanM A TAHER BHUIYANIFTEKHAR UC RAHATJimmiXSEngr.masukMD. SHIBLU AKBARsohidul islamMarkJimmiXSMahfuzr RahmanOsman mas\'udMainul IslamYahia AnowarS.R.RiadMasuk UddinSadia tabassumMd.Riaz Morshed chySharif Mahmud Rajibarif moinMd Sirazul IslamAshraf Arifsheikh zahedmd.alauddin{ala}MonzuBasharRazim Uddin PavelAshaduzzamanarafat rahman minhaz


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Why does people have different blood types?

The types of proteins, glycoproteins and glycolipids found (or expressed) on the surface of red blood cells define blood types. In addition, blood types, or at least the genes responsible for them, are inherited. The original blood types--A, B and O--in 1900 and doctors now recognize 23 blood group systems with hundreds of different types. Many of the blood type antigens (and the antibodies that react with them) have been discovered as a result of transfusion incompatibilities.

An individual either has, or does not have, the Rhesus factor on the surface of their red blood cells. This term strictly refers only to the most immunogenic D antigen of the Rh blood group system, or the Rh- blood group system. The status is usually indicated by Rh positive (Rh+ does have the D antigen) or Rh negative (Rh- does not have the D antigen) suffix to the ABO blood type. However, other antigens of this blood group system are also clinically relevant. These antigens are listed separately . In contrast to the ABO blood group, immunization against Rh can generally only occur through blood transfusion or placental exposure during pregnancy.

The Rh system is the most significant blood-group system in human-blood transfusion with currently 50 antigens. The most significant Rh antigen is the D antigen, because it is the most likely to provoke an immune system response of the five main Rh antigens. It is common for D-negative individuals not to have any anti-D IgG or IgM antibodies, because anti-D antibodies are not usually produced by sensitization against environmental substances. However, D-negative individuals can produce IgG anti-D antibodies following a sensitizing event: possibly a fetomaternal transfusion of blood from a fetus in pregnancy or occasionally a blood transfusion with D positive RBCs.[13] Rh disease can develop in these cases.[14] Rh negative blood types are much less in proportion of Asian populations (0.3%) than they are in White (15%).[15] In the table below, the presence or absence of the Rh antigens is signified by the + or - sign, so that for example the A- group does not have any of the Rh antigens.


Red blood cell compatibility

Blood group AB: individuals have both A and B antigens on the surface of their RBCs, and their blood plasma does not contain any antibodies against either A or B antigen. Therefore, an individual with type AB blood can receive blood from any group (with AB being preferable), but cannot donate blood to either A or B group. They are known as universal recipients.

Blood group A: individuals have the A antigen on the surface of their RBCs, and blood serum containing IgM antibodies against the B antigen. Therefore, a group A individual can receive blood only from individuals of groups A or O (with A being preferable), and can donate blood to individuals with type A or AB.

Blood group B: individuals have the B antigen on the surface of their RBCs, and blood serum containing IgM antibodies against the A antigen. Therefore, a group B individual can receive blood only from individuals of groups B or O (with B being preferable), and can donate blood to individuals with type B or AB.

Blood group O: (or blood group zero in some countries) individuals do not have either A or B antigens on the surface of their RBCs, but their blood serum contains IgM anti-A and anti-B antibodies against the A and B blood group antigens. Therefore, a group O individual can receive blood only from a group O individual, but can donate blood to individuals of any ABO blood group (i.e., A, B, O or AB). If a patient in a hospital situation were to need a blood transfusion in an emergency, and if the time taken to process the recipient's blood would cause a detrimental delay. O Negative blood can be issued. They are known as universal donors.


Blood cell

A blood cell, also called a haematocyte, is a cell produced by haematopoiesis and normally found in blood. In mammals, these fall into three general categories:


Red blood cells — Erythrocytes

White blood cells — Leukocytes

Platelets — Thrombocytes.

Together, these three kinds of blood cells add up to a total 45% of the blood tissue by volume, with the remaining 55% of the volume composed of plasma, the liquid component of blood. This volume percentage (e.g., 45%) of cells to total volume is called hematocrit, determined by centrifuge or flow cytometry. Hemoglobin (the main component of red blood cells) is an iron-containing protein that facilitates transportation of oxygen and other respiratory gases to tissues.

Red blood cells (Erythrocytes)

Red blood cells primarily carry oxygen and collect carbon dioxide through the use of hemoglobin, and have a lifetime of about 120 days. In the process of being formed they go through being a monopotent stem cell.

White blood cells (Leukocytes)

White blood cells, or leukocytes (also spelled leucocytes, leuco- Ancient Greek white), are cells of the immune system involved in defending the body against both infectious disease and foreign materials. Five[1] different and diverse types of leukocytes exist, but they are all produced and derived from a multipotent cell in the bone marrow known as a hematopoietic stem cell. They live for about 3 to 4 days in the average human body. Leukocytes are found throughout the body, including the blood and lymphatic system.

Platelets (Thrombocytes)

Platelets, or thrombocytes , very small, irregularly shaped clear cell fragments (i.e. cells that do not have a nucleus containing DNA), 2–3 µm in diameter, which derive from fragmentation of precursor megakaryocytes. The average lifespan of a platelet is normally just 5 to 9 days. Platelets are a natural source of growth factors. They circulate in the blood of mammals and are involved in hemostasis, leading to the formation of blood clots. Platelets release thread-like fibers to form these clots.

If the number of platelets is too low, excessive bleeding can occur. However, if the number of platelets is too high, blood clots can form (thrombosis), which may obstruct blood vessels and result in such events as a stroke, myocardial infarction, pulmonary embolism—or blockage of blood vessels to other parts of the body, such as the extremities of the arms or legs. An abnormality or disease of the platelets is called a thrombocytopathy, which can be either a low number of platelets (thrombocytopenia), a decrease in function of platelets (thrombasthenia), or an increase in the number of platelets (thrombocytosis). There are disorders that reduce the number of platelets, such as heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT) or thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) that typically cause thromboses, or clots, instead of bleeding.

Platelets release a multitude of growth factors including Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), a potent chemotactic agent, and TGF beta, which stimulates the deposition of extracellular matrix. Both of these growth factors have been shown to play a significant role in the repair and regeneration of connective tissues. Other healing-associated growth factors produced by platelets include basic fibroblast growth factor, insulin-like growth factor 1, platelet-derived epidermal growth factor, and vascular endothelial growth factor. Local application of these factors in increased concentrations through Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) has been used as an adjunct to wound healing for several decades.

who joined with us:
JimmiXSJimmiXSMarkMejbaur Rahman MejbaMd.Abdul Qaiyumarafat rahman minhazIFTEKHAR UC RAHATAshaduzzamanS.R.RiadRazim Uddin PavelMonzuBasharmd.alauddin{ala}sohidul islamsheikh zahedAshraf ArifMd Sirazul IslamYahia Anowararif moinMD. SHIBLU AKBARsohidul islamMahfuzr RahmanMainul IslamSharif Mahmud RajibMd.Riaz Morshed chyAbuhena KaisarEngr.masukOsman mas\'udAminul AhasanSadia tabassumMasuk Uddin